Cyber bullying has a huge impact on society, with mostly negative consequences but some positive consequences. Computers and technology have taken bullying to a whole new level, which in some cases could feel worse than face-to-face bullying. With cyber bullying, it makes it very easy for the bully to stay anonymous so many of the victims are completely unaware of the identity of the cyber bully or bullies. This can be more traumatizing to victims because they have no idea who is harassing them and not being sure if its possible to trace down your anonymous bullies. Another negative effect that technology gives to Cyber bullying is that it allows participation by an infinite audience. This will make the victim believe that everyone is aware of his or her humiliation as well. When something is posted on the computer and Internet, it is usually accessible to anyone (Bhat 2008). Along with these negative consequences computers have with cyber bullying, cyber bullying also can lead to psychological issues. Due to all our advances in technology, such as blogs, instant messages and emails, people are able to bully right from the comfort of their own bedrooms. Due to this accessibility, this Internet content is often disseminated to a wide audience, which strengthens its impact (Auerbach 2009). Some of these effects on victims include depression, anxiety, school phobia, social anxiety, not wanting to leave the house and thoughts or attempted suicide (Weinstein 2006). Although the whole topic of bullying and cyber bullying is a very terrible and negative thing, there can kind of be positive consequences. The main positive that can come from cyber bullying is people becoming aware of this problem and raising awareness to help prevent bullying from continuing. As an example, just a few weeks ago, a Rutgerā€™s student jumped to his death in result of cyber bullying. In wake of this tragedy along with other teen suicides, Facebook recently announced of a partnership between several organizations to curb hate speech on its site (Horn 2010).